Dr. W. Kent Fuchs

Dr. W. Kent Fuchs

Dr. Kent Fuchs became the 12th President of the University of Florida in January 2015.  Under President Fuchs’ leadership, the university has developed shared goals for the decade ahead. UF’s overarching aspiration is to be a premier comprehensive university that the state, nation and world look to for leadership.

Previous to the UF presidency, Dr. Fuchs spent six years as provost of Cornell University.  He was appointed provost after serving as Cornell’s Joseph Silbert Dean of Engineering from 2002 to 2008.  He joined Cornell from Purdue University, where he headed the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering from 1996 to 2002.  He was a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Coordinated Science Laboratory at the University of Illinois from 1985 to 1996.

He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association of the Advancement of Science, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the Association for Computing Machinery, and has received numerous awards for teaching and research.

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Linda Fuchs

Linda Fuchs

Linda Fuchs is an art historian and a former teacher of art, French and journalism. The daughter of Norwegian immigrants, she grew up on Long Island, New York, attended Wheaton College in Illinois, and moved to Florida to teach at The King’s Academy in West Palm Beach. Later, while pursuing a master’s degree in Biblical studies at Trinity, in Deerfield, Illinois, she met Kent Fuchs. Married since 1981, they have four children and two grandchildren. 

Since earning master’s degrees from the University of Chicago and Cornell University, Linda’s research in art history focuses on funerary art of the third and early fourth centuries, a transition from late Roman art to early Christian art, before Christianity became a legal religion of the Roman Empire. One of her contributions identifies the first-known sculptural depiction of the resurrected Jesus. Her essay on this scene, found on the Vatican Jonah sarcophagus, appears in Revisioning: Critical Methods of Seeing Christianity in the History of Art.

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